ParaNexus is an association of paranormal researchers and paranormal investigators who conduct paranormal research and paranormal investigations involving ghosts, spirits, alien abductions, UFOs, unknown creatures, unexplained phenomena, psychic phenomena, and other mysterious events. Visitors can report a UFO sighting, hauntings, and other paranormal events via our 24 Hour Helpline. ParaNexus also offers paranormal investigator certification, paranormal certification, training, paranormal classes, and paranormal courses.
Make Me Think
He who knows much about others may be learned, but he who understands himself is more intelligent. He who controls others may be powerful, but he who has mastered himself is mightier still. - Unknown
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Another blog entry "ParanORBal Preconceptions"  (Read 13321 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Eric Extreme
The Extreme One
Certified Member
*

Kudos 3
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13


Eric Extreme, CLPI, CPI


WWW
« on: December 30, 2011, 12:22:20 PM »

I have posted a new blog entry entitled "ParanORBal Preconceptions." It is about the misusage of photographical orbs in the paranormal field. Check it out here http://extremeparanormal.org/wp/?p=47
Logged

--------------
Eric Extreme, CLPI, CPI
Director, Founder, & Lead Investigator
Extreme Paranormal Investigators Consortium, Incorporated
Brian Parsons
ParaNexus Executive Director
Administration
*

Kudos 49
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 860



WWW
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2011, 07:49:27 PM »

Eric,

Nice post! The Orb phenomena was fueled in the mid to late 1990's by "Dr." Dave Oester whose Yahoo! Groups page boasts thousands of followers (I used to read what he was up to since the field used to follow his lead as this was long before television shows did the same). Mr. Oester claimed that he coined the term "Orb" and took credit for creating the hysteria, although both claims are completely incorrect. Photographic orbs have been documented since photography gained quick shutter speeds and a flash. I have a book from the 1970s about SLR cameras that discusses orbs (and gives no credit to Oester). The hysteria was already there as he utilized the popular misconceptions and just added a few of his own. He claimed that Orbs were in fact ghosts and could easily be captured anywhere and anytime (he was a major advocate of hunting in cemeteries since it was popular with new people and would add followers). After being brought to school by many skeptics and Parapsychologists he quickly jumped ship and joined the EVP bandwagon.

What amazes me most about Orbs is how deeply ingrained it is in ghost belief culture. Whenever I speak on the subject of ghosts I am never surprised to see someone pull out a photo of free floating dust and ask if it's photographic evidence. Despite the scientific explanations and dismissal by hundreds of groups the belief still exists. I doubt this will wane in time and it seems that Orbs will always have their place in the ghost belief system just as many other folkloric beliefs fill our everyday lives (that is until technology can eliminate the pesky dust orb!).
Logged

Mike Lucas
Certified Member
*

Kudos 4
Offline Offline

Posts: 31


« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2011, 07:51:31 AM »

Eric Great Explanation! As I enter the field, I look for more information pertinent to helping me become a better paranormal investigator. Happy New Year!

MJ

Logged
Jeremy Gray
Founder - Gold Vault Paranormal Research Society
Certified Member
*

Kudos 4
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 32


We create our reality.


WWW
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2012, 09:29:38 AM »

Fantastic post Eric!  I'm encouraged by the number of investigators that are dismissing orbs as evidence, and shifting to the real paranormal events.  The field is supersaturated by all this orb nonsense. 

Now my question is, what can we do about it? 

I would love to send some educational material to 90% of the teams I encounter on the web or in person, but that can come across as being 'holier than thou' or just plain rude, it isn't my place to do so.  While there are teams willing to learn from their mistakes and grow as investigators, most aren't.  They are quite content being caught up in the thrill of the hunt, and every piece of dust/pollen/humidity/hair that comes across their lenses is paranormal evidence.  OK off the soap box.

Still the question remains, is there anything we can do to help cleanse the field of all this orb craze? probably not, but I'm not giving up hope!  There are gradual shifts in people's thinking that can eventually lead to that epiphany moment, but they must make that journey and seek the change...  If we can come up with some sort of educational campaign or with some sort of digital brochure or something to send to help keep these new teams from getting swept up in the undercurrents of popular belief and tribal wisdom, I'm all for it.  Maybe something along the lines of "hey welcome to the field, here are some things to consider as you develop as a team"... Just thinking aloud.

Great entry Eric, I'll add the link to my webpage!
Logged
Brian Parsons
ParaNexus Executive Director
Administration
*

Kudos 49
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 860



WWW
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2012, 02:36:55 PM »

Jeremy,

Quote
Still the question remains, is there anything we can do to help cleanse the field of all this orb craze? probably not, but I'm not giving up hope!  There are gradual shifts in people's thinking that can eventually lead to that epiphany moment, but they must make that journey and seek the change...  If we can come up with some sort of educational campaign or with some sort of digital brochure or something to send to help keep these new teams from getting swept up in the undercurrents of popular belief and tribal wisdom, I'm all for it.  Maybe something along the lines of "hey welcome to the field, here are some things to consider as you develop as a team"...

The larger issue is that the general public has bought in to the Orb craze, so this problem is greater than the groups that litter the world. My group and personal motto is "Educating the public, one person at a time..." and this is really all you can do. Trying to educate other groups is fruitless and most will consider it an attack on their belief system. I enjoy going to libraries, conferences, conventions, and other events to talk about the misconceptions about ghosts among other things and it provides a place where open minded people will gather and are looking to be influenced (notice a lot of groups don't go to these things unless something is in it for them?).

Trying to change the field seems to be the goal of many groups and individuals, the reality is something like that would take a whole lot of influence as well as a whole lot of time; and that just doesn't happen very often. By starting small you can influence a lot of people over time, by doing the work and providing evidence to support your claims (or the evidence of others) you can stand by your claims confidently. A few years back I did a demonstration on orbs in a library where I took a photo of the room (control shot) and then stomped on the ground and took a photo. Many people were amazed to see how simple it was to take an orb shot and how the pictures looked just like ghosts. Did I convince everyone? Probably not, but there has to be somebody in that room that went on to correct someone else's belief set and a small victory is a victory indeed.

Since the belief that orbs are ghosts is ingrained in the culture of ghosts it will take a long time to reverse or dissolve that belief. Many superstitions, urban legends and folklore tales are so deeply ingrained in our culture that they become fact though based on one of the aforementioned models.

Groups seem very reluctant to ask for help or to educate themselves beyond what they can easily search for on the internet (unlike those of us who spend time at great spots like ParaNexus!). Rarely do I get any questions or requests for help (other than case handouts or help with a case of theirs). Coming up with a brochure is a great idea, although most groups would just throw it in the trash. A welcoming kit is a great thought as well and is definitely something that is needed in this field. Think about all the groups that pop up only to fold months or a year or so later. What happened to the knowledge they gained? What happens when a veteran group folds? Where is all of the information that is gathered going? The lack of self education as well as passing on of knowledge (learned or gained) is one of the driving forces behind me writing books. Not to metion it gives me a little piece of mind knowing that I put the truth out there and if I walk away tomorrow the truth is still out there for someone else to discover...
Logged

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: